Community College of Allegheny County (CCAC)

Community College of Allegheny County

CIT: Types of IT Classes

College Credit academic courses

  1. College credit courses provide a mix of both theoretical concepts and hands-on use of various applications and tools. As such, they provide a particular course of study that prepares individuals for entry-level employment in a particular IT career, such as software development, network administration, user support, and web site development.

  2. Courses are taught by faculty and professionals working in the IT field to a common syllabus that defines the expected learning outcomes and topics covered. In addition to time spent in the classroom and labs, students are expected to spend a significant amount of individual time outside of class in preparation, completing homework assignments, or studying for exams.

  3. CCAC's low tuition and the availability of financial aid for college credit courses make this a very affordable option for those people wanting to earn an associate's degree, certificate, or transfer to a four-year college or university to earn a bachelor's degree.

Community Education (non-credit) courses

  1. Community Education courses are intended to introduce various IT concepts and tools to members of the general community, and to provide some practical hands-on experience for personal use at home or work. As such, these courses are not intended for pursuing a formal education (i.e. non-credit).

  2. Course content with respect to addressing the topics in the course description are at the instructor's discretion. There is no homework, exams, or grades given to students.

  3. The cost of a course is very reasonable, and classes are held at many convenient times and locations throughout the area.

Professional Development courses

  1. Professional Development courses are non-credit courses run out of our Community Education division that address the needs of businesses or those people currently employed as computer professionals. As such, these courses primarily provide knowledge and hands-on use of specific high-end IT technology and related products, and are less concept-oriented than a college credit course. Many of these courses involve specific proprietary products and lead to industry-recognized certifications. Individuals that achieve certain industry certifications can apply this toward college credit in earning a CIT associates degree or certificate from CCAC.

  2. These courses are taught by professionals working in the IT field to a common syllabus that defines the expected learning outcomes and topics covered. In addition to time spent in the classroom and labs, students are expected to spend a significant amount of individual time outside of class in preparation, and possibly performing homework assignments or quizzes/exams if required to prepare for taking a certification exam. However, there is no grade associated with the course.

  3. While more expensive than a college credit course, professional development courses are reasonably priced when compared to similar training providers in the area.